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Canto 9

S'rî Krishna Caitanya

        

 

Chapter 14: King Purûravâ Enchanted by Urvas'î

(1) S'rî S'uka said: 'Hear now then oh King [after the stories about the dynasty of the sun god] about the moon dynasty, for to listen to the sanctifying descriptions of the dynasty of kings headed by Aila [Purûravâ], is a glorious thing. (2) Dhâtu [the 'original element' or Lord Brahmâ] appeared on the lotus that was produced from the navel of Vishnu, He with the thousands of heads. Dhâtu had a son called Atri who had the same qualities as his father. (3) From Atri's tears of jubilation a son called Soma was born who was an embodiment of the nectar of immortality [see also 4.1: 15]. He was by Brahmâ appointed as the supreme authority over the scholars, the medicinal herbs and the luminaries [see also B.G. 10: 21 and 6.6: 23]. (4) After he had conquered the three worlds, he performed a râjasûya sacrifice and kidnapped in his arrogance with force Târâ, the wife of Brihaspati. (5) Despite a repeated request of the spiritual master of the godly ones, he in his conceit did not release her, as a consequence of which a conflict arose between the Suras and the Dânavas. (6) Because of S'ukra's ['semen', the spiritual master of the Asuras] enmity towards Brihaspati he together with the Asuras chose the side of the moon god. S'iva though took together with the host of ghosts following him out of affection for the side of [Brihaspati,] the son of  the spiritual teacher [Angirâ, one of the seven sages]. (7) The great Indra followed by all the different demigods, joined the spiritual master [Brihaspati]. The fight that ensued - just because of Târâ [Brihaspati's wife] - brought great destruction over the Suras and Asuras. (8) When the creator of the universe Lord Brahmâ, was fully informed about this by Angirâ, he severely chastised Soma and delivered Târâ unto her husband. He discovered that she was pregnant.

(9) [Brihaspati said to her:] 'You foolish woman, deliver now! Deliver immediately from that womb that was my domain. Despite having been impregnated by another man I shall not burn you, unfaithful as you are, to ashes because you were a woman in want of a child.'

(10) Târâ, deeply ashamed, delivered a child that had a golden effulgence. That made Brihaspati and Soma both desire the child. (11) 'It is mine, not yours!' so they exclaimed fighting over the child. The sages and the gods asked Târâ questions, but she in her embarrassment could not say a thing.

(12) The child got angry and said to its mother: 'Why all this shame? Why are you not saying anything? Tell me immediately oh unchaste lady, what you have done wrong!'

(13) Lord Brahmâ took her separate, put her at ease and asked her about the details, upon which she admitted hesitantly: 'This child belongs to Soma'. Soma then immediately took charge of it. (14) Oh King, when the child because of its profound intelligence received from Lord Brahmâ the name Budha, the god of the moon was in great jubilation that he had gotten such a son. (15-16) As I said before [in 9.1], from his [Budha's] loins Purûravâ was born from the womb of Ilâ. When Urvas'î [see also 9.13: 6] in Indra's court heard Nârada speak about Purûravâ's beauty, qualities, magnanimity, behavior, wealth and power, the devî was struck by the arrows of Cupid and approached him. (17-18) Because of the curse of Mitra and Varuna the woman had descended to the human world. Seeing there that the best of all men was as beautiful as Cupid, she approached him self-controlled. As soon as he, the king, saw the divine woman, he with goose bumps addressed her enthused with sweet words and bright eyes. (19) The honorable king said: 'Be welcome o supreme beauty, please be seated, what can I do for you? Keep me company and share my bed for many, many years!'

(20) Urvas'î said: 'What woman would not be attracted by the sight and thought of you, oh beautiful man, and desist from enjoying your chest in intimate love [see also 7.9: 45]? (21) These two lambs, oh King, have fallen and need your protection oh honorable host. In the company of a superior husband so one says, a woman may enjoy in love. (22) Oh hero of mine, that what is prepared with ghee shall be my food and I do not want to see you naked at any other time than during intercourse.'

'
That is settled then', so promised the great soul.

(23) 'Just look at your beauty and poise! No one on earth is as attractive as you are. Who can withstand a goddess like you who personally has descended among the human beings?'

(24) He, the best among the human beings, enjoyed in the most exquisite places and pleasure gardens like Caitraratha, with her whatever there was to enjoy to his desire [see also 5.16: 13-14]. (25) Making love with the goddess he enjoyed it for many nights and days to be with her and smell the stimulating lotus saffron fragrance of her face.

 (26) Indra not seeing Urvas'î [around] told the singers of heaven: 'Without Urvas'î my abode is not as beautiful'. (27) Thus they in the dead of night assembled in the dark to steal away the two lambs that Urvas'î as a wife had entrusted to the king. (28) When she heard the two [that she treated like her] sons, cry as they were lead away, she said: 'My life is stolen away by this bad husband who considers himself a hero but is not a real man! (29) Confiding in him who during the day appears to be a man but at night fearfully keeps himself silent as a woman, thieves have stolen away my two sons.'

(30) Pierced by the arrows of her words he, like an elephant fired up, angrily in the dark took up a sword and went after them, without putting his clothes on. (31) After they [the Gandharvas], gave up the lambs, they lit up the place with a light as bright as  lightening. Urvas'î thus could see her husband returning naked with the two lambs in his hands... [and thus she left him]. (32) Purûravâ not seeing his wife in bed any longer, got very sad. Being too much attached to her he got distraught and lamenting began to roam the earth [looking for her]. (33) He spotted Urvas'î in Kurukshetra [a place of pilgrimage, see also B.G. 1: 1] at the Sarasvatî together with five companions. Happy and smiling all over Purûravâ addressed her with sweet words: (34) 'Ah my wife, do not leave, stay oh cruel one! You should not have given up on me because I failed to make you happy thus far. Let us talk a little. (35) This good body of mine, led far, far away from home by you, will drop dead on the spot oh devî and the foxes and vultures will eat it, if it is not worthy of your grace!'

(36) Urvas'î said: 'You are a man, do not adhere to death! Do not let these foxes of the senses eat you up. You cannot always count on the friendship of women. They can be like wolves in matters of the heart. (37) Beware of them, women are merciless [when men forsake their duty, see B.G. 1: 40]. They are cunning, hard to handle, do whatever pleases them and put you as a faithful husband and brother down for the smallest reason, so one says. (38) They establish false hopes in the ones unsuspecting, run away from their well-wishers, always desire for newer and newer things, are easily allured and are real captains of independence [if they have to]. (39) At the end of every year your good self may count on one night only in order to make love with me my husband, so that you, one after the other, will have children in this world my dear [see also 6.18: 38-42].'

(40) Seeing that Urvas'î was pregnant he returned to his palace. At the end of the year he then at that very spot [at Kurukshetra] saw Urvas'î again, who had become the mother of a hero. (41) Obtaining her association he, delighting in her company, in great jubilation reunited with her. After the night had passed Urvas'î said to the poor-hearted fellow who was afflicted by the thought of being separated from her: (42) 'Go and take shelter of the singers of heaven, the Gandharvas. When you satisfy them with prayers they will bring me to you.' His [agnisthâlî] fire pot oh King, then gave him the idea that Urvas'î was really walking with him through the forest. (43) When he returned from the forest and had given up the fire pot, he at home began to meditate the entire night. During that time Tretâ-yuga was about to begin and before his mind's eye the three [trikânda principles of the Vedas] were revealed [of upâsanâ: sacrifice, song and prayer; karma: fruitive labor and jñâna: spiritual knowledge]. (44-45) Going to where he had left his fire pot he discovered that at that spot an As'vattha had sprouted from the inside of a s'amî tree. He used the wood to make two sticks [for creating fire] whereupon he, the master of the kingdom, with mantras [*], in his desire to be with Urvas'î, meditated on her as the lower stick, himself as the upper one and that what was between them as the child he had begotten. (46) From the friction a fire was born that, as the son of the king together with the three letter combination A, U and M [the Pranava], in its three forms stood for the complete of the Vedic practice [of being born from one's physical father,  from one's spiritual master and from one's own practice of offering - which is represented by the three sacrificial fires called Âhavanîya, Gârhapatya and Dâkashinâgni]. (47) He who wanted to be with Urvas'î thus worshiped the Controller of the Sacrifices, the Supreme Personality of Godhead beyond the senses who is the Lord, the Reservoir of all Demigods [see also B.G. 3: 10]. (48) Formerly [during Satya-yuga] all verbal [Vedic, atharva] expressions were covered with one mantra only, knowing the Pranava of omkâra, Nârâyana was the only god, there was only one fire and there was only one varna [the class called hamsa **]. (49) This is how with Purûravâ at the onset of Tretâ-yuga, the [before mentioned] threefold Vedic order [of being born by karma, upâsana and jñâna] came about oh ruler of man. By simply generating the sacrificial fire as his son, the king achieved the heavenly abode of the Gandharvas.'

 

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  Third revised edition, loaded February 1, 2013.

 

 

 

 

Previous Aadhar edition and Vedabase links:

Text 1

S'rî S'uka said: 'Hear now then oh King [after the stories about the dynasty of the sun god] about the moon dynasty, for to listen to the sanctifying descriptions of the dynasty of kings headed by Aila [Purûravâ], is a glorious thing.
S'rî S'uka said: 'And now after this [after the stories about the dynasty of the sungod] hear about, o King, the dynasty of the moon, as it, that listening to the purifying descriptions of the kings headed by Aila [Purûravâ] of that dynasty, is a glorious thing. (Vedabase)

 

Text 2

Dhâtu [the 'original element' or Lord Brahmâ] appeared on the lotus that was produced from the navel of Vishnu, He with the thousands of heads. Dhâtu had a son called Atri who had the same qualities as his father.

From the Supreme Spirit who has thousands of heads, Dhâtu [the 'original element' or Lord Brahmâ], who had appeared on the lotus that sprang from the lake of the navel [of Vishnu], there was a son called Atri with the same qualities as his father. (Vedabase)


Text 3

From Atri's tears of jubilation a son called Soma was born who was an embodiment of the nectar of immortality [see also 4.1: 15]. He was by Brahmâ appointed as the supreme authority over the scholars, the medicinal herbs and the luminaries [see also B.G. 10: 21 and 6.6: 23].

From his tears of jubilation was born a son [see also 4.1: 15]: Soma, the god of the moon with its nectarine rays who indeed by Brahmâ was appointed as the supreme authority over the learned, the medicinal herbs and the luminaries [see also B.G. 10.21 and 6.6: 23]. (Vedabase)

 

Text 4

After he had conquered the three worlds, he performed a râjasûya sacrifice and kidnapped in his arrogance with force Târâ, the wife of Brihaspati.

He, after conquering the three worlds, performed a râjasûya sacrifice and kidnapped in his arrogance with force the wife of Brihaspati named Târâ. (Vedabase)

 

Text 5

Despite a repeated request of the spiritual master of the godly ones, he in his conceit did not release her, as a consequence of which a conflict arose between the Suras and the Dânavas.

When over and over the spiritual master of the godly pleaded with him did he in his lust not release her and was there because of this a fight between the suras and the dânavas. (Vedabase)

   

Text 6

Because of S'ukra's ['semen', the spiritual master of the Asuras] enmity towards Brihaspati he together with the Asuras chose the side of the moongod. S'iva though took together with the host of ghosts following him out of affection for the side of [Brihaspati,] the son of  the spiritual teacher [Angirâ, one of the seven sages].

Because of the enmity of S'ukra ['semen', the spiritual master of the asuras] towards Brihaspati took S'ukra with the asuras the side of the moongod, but S'iva with the hideous and ghostly following him sided affectionately with [Brihaspati,] the son of his guru [that was Angirâ whom he had learned from]. (Vedabase)

 

Text 7

The great Indra followed by all the different demigods, joined the spiritual master [Brihaspati]. The fight that ensued - just because of Târâ [Brihaspati's wife] - brought great destruction over the Suras and Asuras.

The great Indra followed by all the different demigods joined the spiritual master [Brihaspati] and the fight that so ensued brought, just because of Târâ, great destruction over sura and asura. (Vedabase)

 

Text 8

When the creator of the universe Lord Brahmâ, was fully informed about this by Angirâ, he severely chastised Soma and delivered Târâ unto her husband. He discovered that she was pregnant.

The Mover of the Universe, Lord Brahmâ, who was fully informed on this by Angirâ severely chastised Soma and delivered Târâ unto her husband who found out she was pregnant. (Vedabase)

 

Text 9

[Brihaspati said to her:] 'You foolish woman, deliver now! Deliver immediately from that womb that was my domain. Despite having been impregnated by another man I shall not burn you, unfaithful as you are, to ashes because you were a woman in want of a child.'

[Brihaspati said to her:] 'You foolish woman, deliver now, deliver immediately from that womb that was meant for me; though impregnated by another shall I not put you, unfaithful, on the stake as you were a woman in want of a child.' (Vedabase)

 

Text 10

Târâ, deeply ashamed, delivered a child that had a golden effulgence. That made Brihaspati and Soma both desire the child.

Târâ deeply ashamed delivered a child that had an effulgence like that of gold which made Brihaspati and Soma truly desire for the child. (Vedabase)

 

Text 11

'It is mine, not yours!' so they exclaimed fighting over the child. The sages and the gods asked Târâ questions, but she in her embarrassment could not say a thing.

'Mine it is, not yours!' thus they cried over the child fighting one another while Târâ could not tell all the saintly and gods inquiring anything in her shame about it. (Vedabase)

 

Text 12

The child got angry and said to its mother: 'Why all this shame? Why are you not saying anything? Tell me immediately oh unchaste lady, what you have done wrong!'

The child said angered to its mother: 'What is the need for this shame, why don't you speak up and do you keep it a secret; tell me right now what mistake you've made!'(Vedabase)

 

Text 13

Lord Brahmâ took her separate, put her at ease and asked her about the details, upon which she admitted hesitantly: 'This child belongs to Soma'. Soma then immediately took charge of it.

Putting her at ease took Lord Brahmâ her separate and inquired he in detail with her upon which she admitted hesitantly: 'This child belongs to Soma'. Immediately took Soma then charge of it. (Vedabase)

 

Text 14

Oh King, when the child because of its profound intelligence received from Lord Brahmâ the name Budha, the god of the moon was in great jubilation that he had gotten such a son. 

Because of its profound intelligence was the god of the moon in great jubilation about having gotten such a son and honored Lord Brahmâ it with the name Budha. (Vedabase)

 

Text 15-16

As I said before [in 9.1], from his [Budha's] loins Purûravâ was born from the womb of Ilâ. When Urvas'î [see also 9.13: 6] in Indra's court heard Nârada speak about Purûravâ's beauty, qualities, magnanimity, behavior, wealth and power, the devî was struck by the arrows of Cupid and approached him.

From him was, as I said [in 9.1], from Ilâ [formerly Sudyumna] born Purûravâ. When Urvas'î [see also 9.13: 6] in Indra's court heard Nârada speaking about his beauty, qualities, magnanimity, behavior, wealth and power got the devî near him and was she struck by the arrows of Cupid. (Vedabase)

   

Text 17-18

Because of the curse of Mitra and Varuna the woman had descended to the human world. Seeing there that the best of all men was as beautiful as Cupid, she approached him self-controlled. As soon as he, the king, saw the divine woman, he with goose bumps addressed her enthused with sweet words and bright eyes.

From Mitra and Varuna's cursing had the woman acquired human habits and did she, seeing the best of males as beautiful as Cupid, patiently and submissively seek his company. He, the king, when he saw the divine woman addressed her enthused with sweet words, bright eyes and his hairs erect in jubilation. (Vedabase)

   

Text 19

The honorable king said: 'Be welcome o supreme beauty, please be seated, what can I do for you? Keep me company and share my bed for many, many years!'

The honorable king said: 'Be welcome o greatest of all beauty, please be seated, what can I do for you? Keep me company and share my bed for many many years! (Vedabase)

 

Text 20

Urvas'î said: 'What woman would not be attracted by the sight and thought of you, oh beautiful man, and desist from enjoying your chest in intimate love [see also 7.9: 45]?

Urvas'î said: 'What woman would not be attracted by the sight and thought of you, o beautiful man, and desist from enjoying your chest in lust and love? [see also 7.9: 45] (Vedabase)

  

Text 21

These two lambs, oh King, have fallen and need your protection oh honorable host. In the company of a superior husband so one says, a woman may enjoy in love.

These two lambs, o King, have fallen down and need your protection, o honorable host; in the company of a superior husband so one says can a woman enjoy the sexual union. (Vedabase)

 

Text 22

Oh hero of mine, that what is prepared with ghee shall be my food and I do not want to see you naked at any other time than during intercourse.'

'That is settled then', so promised the great soul.

What is prepared with ghee, o hero of mine, shall be my food and I will not see you at any other time naked but at the time of intercourse.'

'That is how it shall be' promised the great soul, (Vedabase)

  

Text 23

'Just look at your beauty and poise! No one on earth is as attractive as you are. Who can withstand a goddess like you who personally has descended among the human beings?'

'See your beauty and your poise, no one on earth is as attractive, who can withstand such a goddess that in person has arrived among the human beings!' (Vedabase)

    

Text 24

He, the best among the human beings, enjoyed in the most exquisite places and pleasure gardens like Caitraratha, with her whatever there was to enjoy to his desire [see also 5.16: 13-14].

With her enjoyed he, the best among man, whatever there was to enjoy to his desire in the best of all places and gardens like Caitraratha [see also 5.16: 13-14]. (Vedabase)


Text 25

Making love with the goddess he enjoyed it for many nights and days to be with her and smell the stimulating lotus saffron fragrance of her face.

Delighted with her and ever more aroused by the fragrance of her beautiful face enjoyed he day by day for long to live with her, the gods gift as sweet as the saffron of a lotus. (Vedabase)

 

Text 26

Indra not seeing Urvas'î [around] told the singers of heaven: 'Without Urvas'î my abode is not as beautiful'.

Not seeing Urvas'î told Indra the singers of heaven: 'Without my Urvas'î is my abode not as beautiful'. (Vedabase)

  

Text 27

Thus they in the dead of night assembled in the dark to steal away the two lambs that Urvas'î as a wife had entrusted to the king.

Thus came they in the dead of night, when it was dark all around, to steal Urvas'î's two lambs that she as his wife had entrusted the king. (Vedabase)

 

Text 28

When she heard the two [that she treated like her] sons, cry as they were lead away, she said: 'My life is stolen away by this bad husband who considers himself a hero but is not a real man!

Hearing them, whom she treated as her sons, cry as they were taken away said she: 'I am finished with such a bad eunuch of a husband who thinks himself to be a hero! (Vedabase)

 

Text 29

Confiding in him who during the day appears to be a man but at night fearfully keeps himself silent as a woman, thieves have stolen away my two sons.'

I've now lost my two 'sons' depending on him who, during the day a male, lies down at night as a woman afraid of plunderers.' (Vedabase)


Text 30

Pierced by the arrows of her words he, like an elephant fired up, angrily in the dark took up a sword and went after them, without putting his clothes on.

Pierced by the arrows of her harsh words took he, like an elephant fired up, in the dark a sword at hand and went he out naked and angry. (Vedabase)

 

Text 31

After they [the Gandharvas], gave up the lambs, they lit up the place with a light as bright as  lightening. Urvas'î thus could see her husband returning naked with the two lambs in his hands... [and thus she left him].

They [the gandharva's] , after giving up the lambs, lit, shining like lightening, the place up so that Urvas'î could see her husband naked returning with the two in his hands [and so she left]. (Vedabase)

 

Text 32

Purûravâ not seeing his wife in bed any longer, got very sad. Being too much attached to her he got distraught and lamenting began to roam the earth [looking for her].

He not seeing his wife in bed, very morose in his attachment to her, totally upset lamented and started to roam the earth like a madman. (Vedabase)


Text 33

He spotted Urvas'î in Kurukshetra [a place of pilgrimage, see also B.G. 1: 1] at the Sarasvatî together with five companions. Happy and smiling all over Purûravâ addressed her with sweet words: 

He spotted Urvas'î in Kurukshetra [a place of pilgrimage, see also B.G. 1: 1] at the Sarasvatî with five companions and happy and smiling all over addressed Purûravâ her with sweet words: (Vedabase)

 

Text 34

'Ah my wife, do not leave, stay oh cruel one! You should not have given up on me because I failed to make you happy thus far. Let us talk a little. 

'Ah, my wife, stay, stay o cruel one. You shouldn't have given up on me because I thus far didn't make you happy. Let's talk a little. (Vedabase)

 

Text 35

This good body of mine, led far, far away from home by you, will drop dead on the spot oh devî and the foxes and vultures will eat it, if it is not worthy of your grace!'

(This nice body, taken far far away from home by you, will drop dead on the spot o devî, and the foxes and vultures will eat it if it is not worthy your grace!' (Vedabase)

 

Text 36

Urvas'î said: 'You are a man, do not adhere to death! Do not let these foxes of the senses eat you up. You cannot always count on the friendship of women. They can be like wolves in matters of the heart.

Urvas'î said: 'You're a man, don't adhere to death, do not let these foxes of the senses eat you up; be sure not to expect any friendship from the heart of the women that are [can be] like foxes. (Vedabase)

 

Text 37

Beware of them, women are merciless [when men forsake their duty, see B.G. 1: 40]. They are cunning, hard to handle, do whatever pleases them and put you as a faithful husband and brother down for the smallest reason, so one says.

Beware, women [when men forsake their duty, see B.G. 1: 40] have no mercy, they're cunning and hard to handle, they dare do whatever pleases them and put you indeed as a faithful husband and brother down for the smallest reason so one says. (Vedabase)

 

Text 38

They establish false hopes in the ones unsuspecting, run away from their well-wishers, always desire for newer and newer things, are easily allured and are real captains of independence [if they have to].

They establish false hopes in the unsuspecting, run out of their well-wishers, ever desire for newer and newer things, are easily allured and real captains of independence. (Vedabase)

 

Text 39

At the end of every year your good self may count on one night only in order to make love with me my husband, so that you, one after the other, will have children in this world my dear [see also 6.18: 38-42].

At the end of every year may your good self count on one night only with me, my husband, to have sex so that you one after the other can put children on this world, my dearest [see also 6.18: 38-42].' (Vedabase)

 

Text 40

Seeing that Urvas'î was pregnant he returned to his palace. At the end of the year he then at that very spot [at Kurukshetra] saw Urvas'î again, who had become the mother of a hero.

Seeing that Urvas'î was pregnant returned he to his palace to see at the end of the year at that very spot Urvas'î, the mother of a hero, again. (Vedabase)

 

Text 41

Obtaining her association he, delighting in her company, in great jubilation reunited with her. After the night had passed Urvas'î said to the poor-hearted fellow who was afflicted by the thought of being separated from her: 

Getting her association he in great jubilation reunited with her enjoying her company. When the night had passed said Urvas'î to the poor-hearted one who was afflicted by the thought of separation: (Vedabase)

 

Text 42

'Go and take shelter of the singers of heaven, the Gandharvas. When you satisfy them with prayers they will bring me to you.' His [agnisthâlî] fire pot oh King, then gave him the idea that Urvas'î was really walking with him through the forest.

'Go and take shelter with the singers of heaven, the gandharvas, they will deliver you the like of me when you satisfy them with prayers', and that [agnisthâlî] girl delivered from the fire of sacrifice o King, made him, walking the forest, think that she was real. (Vedabase)

 

Text 43

When he returned from the forest and had given up the fire pot, he at home began to meditate the entire night. During that time Tretâ-yuga was about to begin and before his mind's eye the three [trikânda principles of the Vedas] were revealed [of upâsanâ: sacrifice, song and prayer; karma: fruitive labor and jñâna: spiritual knowledge].

Giving up the substitute girl [sthâlî means substitute] began he, returning from the forest, at home to meditate the whole night during the time that Tretâ Yuga was about to begin and were before his mind's eye the three [tri-kânda principles of the Veda's, of upâsanâ: sacrifice, song and prayer; karma: fruitive labor and, jnâna: spiritual knowledge] revealed. (Vedabase)

 

Text 44-45

Going to where he had left his fire pot he discovered that at that spot an As'vattha had sprouted from the inside of a s'amî tree. He used the wood to make two sticks [for creating fire] whereupon he, the master of the kingdom, with mantras [*], in his desire to be with Urvas'î, meditated on her as the lower stick, himself as the upper one and that what was between them as the child he had begotten.

Going to where he left his sthâlî-woman saw he that an Asvattha had sprouted from the inside of a s'amî tree. From the both of them made he, desiring to get to were Urvas'î was, two sticks [to ignite fire] and meditated he, the master of the kingdom, with mantras [*] on Urvas'î as the lower stick, himself as the upper one and what was between them as the child he had begotten. (Vedabase)

 

Text 46

From the friction a fire was born that, as the son of the king together with the three letter combination A, U and M [the Pranava], in its three forms stood for the complete of the Vedic practice [of being born from one's physical father, from one's spiritual master and from one's own practice of offering - which is represented by the three sacrificial fires called Âhavanîya, Gârhapatya and Dâkashinâgni].

From the friction was born the fire to enjoy vedically the three principles of which by the King a son of three letters [AUM] turned out to be born [see B.G. 9 17, 8: 13 and 17: 24]. (Vedabase)

 

Text 47

He who wanted to be with Urvas'î thus worshiped the Controller of the Sacrifices, the Supreme Personality of Godhead beyond the senses who is the Lord, the Reservoir of all Demigods [see also B.G. 3: 10].

That way he worshiped, desirous to reach Urvas'î's place, the Controller of the Sacrifices, the Supreme Personality of Godhead beyond the senses that is the Lord, the Reservoir of all Demigods [see also B.G. 3:10]. (Vedabase)

 

Text 48

Formerly [during Satya-yuga] all verbal [Vedic, atharva] expressions were covered with one mantra only, knowing the Pranava of omkâra, Nârâyana was the only god, there was only one fire and there was only one varna [the class called hamsa **].

Formerly indeed were with only one mantra, knowing the pranava of omkâra, all oral [vedic, atharva] expressions covered, was Nârâyana the only God and was there for Agni assuredly no other varna [class, color or vocation] but one [called hams'a **]. (Vedabase)

 

Text 49

This is how with Purûravâ at the onset of Tretâ-yuga, the [before mentioned] threefold Vedic order [of being born by karma, upâsana and jñâna] came about oh ruler of man. By simply generating the sacrificial fire as his son, the king achieved the heavenly abode of the Gandharvas.'

Thus were there from Purûravâ the vedic three at the onset of Tretâ Yuga, o ruler of man; by simply generating as his son the sacrificial fire achieved the king the abode of the gandharvas. (Vedabase)

 

*: In this context are mentioned the mantra's: 's'amî-garbhâd agnim mantha' 'from within the s'amî the fire is churned' and 'urvas'yâm urasi purûravâh': 'by Urvas'î the best of Purûravâ.' 

**:  In Satya-yuga, Lord Nârâyana was worshiped by meditation (krite yad dhyayâto vishnum): everyone meditated and achieved success contemplating Lord Vishnu, Nârâyana. In the next yuga, Tretâ-yuga, the performance of yajña began (tretâyâm yajato mukhaih). In Dvâpara-yuga the Lord is worshiped as a king, while in Kali-yuga the Lord is there as his own devotee [a covered or channa-avatâra] to lead in devotion.

 

 

 

Creative Commons License
The text and audio are offered under the conditions of the
Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 3.0 Unported License.
The painting of Urvas'i is painted by Raja Ravi Varma. Source.
Production:
Filognostic Association of The Order of Time


 

 

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